Showing posts with label Sun Sounds of Arizona. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Sun Sounds of Arizona. Show all posts

Thursday, January 7, 2016

Wednesday, January 14, 2015

Watch 12News Discussion with Sun Sounds of AZ

still image from today's broadcast with 12News.

Sun Sounds of Arizona Manager of Programming and Volunteers Andrea Pasquale joined volunteers and the 12News team this morning, to increase awareness about the services Sun Sounds provides. 

Included in the discussion was Donna Schober, who has been a Sun Sounds volunteer for 35 years!  

You can watch the segment now on YouTube.

Sun Sounds is a community service of Rio Salado College. We are always looking for volunteers who have a passion for reading. Visit sunsounds.org for more details.

Tuesday, August 19, 2014

Sign Up for SPOT 127 Program

KJZZ's award-winning youth media center, SPOT 127, is now accepting applications for its free after-school program.

This program provides instruction and mentoring in digital photography, audio production, video production and journalism to Valley high school students. Participants create original content while learning from professional journalists and industry experts.

Students attend two days per week from 3:30 p.m. to 6 p.m. for the entire semester at SPOT 127’s state-of-the-art facility in West Phoenix. All equipment, including computers, software, cameras and audio recorders, is provided.

Last year, two students won a National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences Student Production Award for one of their video projects. Neither teenager had any video experience before joining SPOT 127.

Classes begin Sept. 8 and Sept. 9. Space is limited to 60 students, and spots are filling up fast! To apply or get more information, please visit http://spot127.org/node/100.

KJZZ and Spot 127 are a community service of Rio Salado College.

Tuesday, August 12, 2014

Sun Sounds Volunteer Honored

Congratulations to Tempe Sun Sounds Volunteer Roger Ferland who was named the 2014 Outstanding Disabled Veteran of the Year, the highest accolade from the Disabled American Veterans.

Serving as a squad leader and platoon sergeant during the war in 1968, Ferland lost both legs and sustained severe injuries to his arm.

Today, Ferland believes in giving back. After practicing law for more than 35 years, he worked with his local DAV to spearhead legal clinics run by the State Bar of Arizona where more than 300 lawyers provide pro bono legal assistance to veterans, particularly in the much-needed area of family law.

Ferland was profiled in a recent article in the Arizona Republic. Learn more about how Ferland serves his community in this video.

Sun Sounds of Arizona provides audio access to printed information for anyone with a disability that makes reading print difficult. Sun Sounds of Arizona is part of the Division of Public Service at Rio Salado College, one of the ten Maricopa County Community Colleges.

Saturday, July 28, 2012

Visually Impaired Residents Tune in to "Talking" Radio

Written by Heidi Capriotti, Marketing Coordinator for Sun Sounds of Arizona

Sun Sounds listener Bob Burrows
and wife Carol
Bob Burrows can read the Arizona Republic with his eyes closed. Like nearly 2000 Valley residents, Bob is visually impaired, and listens to newspapers and other printed information on Sun Sounds of Arizona. For the last 15 years Bob has listened to newspapers read aloud on a special analog radio provided by Sun Sounds. But today Bob will turn on his new “talking” radio to hear the newspaper.

This month, with a grant from Virginia G. Piper Charitable Trust, Sun Sounds upgraded Bob’s analog radio to The Narrator, a new, accessible AM/FM/HD radio created by Insignia, Best Buy’s private label brand. The Narrator’s voice prompts help people with visual impairments tune the radio, set the clock, and set the alarm. “I love it,” said Bob, “It tells me exactly what button I’ve touched. And the digital signal from Sun Sounds has no interference. It sounds great. Now my wife Carol doesn’t have to find radio stations for me!”

Sun Sounds of Arizona first brought the idea of a digital talking radio to Best Buy’s development team five years ago, citing the number of American consumers with vision loss (an estimated 25 million) and the aging baby-boomer population. Since then, Best Buy has worked closely with David Noble, Development Director at Sun Sounds of Arizona, to bring a universally-designed, digital radio to the market. “Because this radio talks, anyone with low vision can use it right out of the box. But it is also feature-rich for the sighted consumer, at a price point that’s affordable.” says Noble.

When the Narrator came to market, Virginia G. Piper Charitable Trust seized the opportunity to help older Valley residents with vision loss access the newest digital radio technology. “Providing access to a reading service via the latest technology aligns with Piper Trust’s mission of making our communities more livable and increasing independence for older adults,” said Carol Kratz, Program Director with Virginia G. Piper Charitable Trust. With grant funding from Virginia G. Piper Charitable Trust, 200 Sun Sounds listeners will receive a free upgrade to the Narrator this summer. Other listeners can purchase the Narrator talking radio on Best Buy’s website.

Sun Sounds of Arizona broadcasts on KBAQ 89.5-HD 3, and is a service of Rio Salado College.

Article published in the Tempe Republic July 28

Monday, January 2, 2012

Volunteer Thespians Perform Shakespeare's 'Measure for Measure' on Sun Sounds of Arizona

In the 1940’s Americans gathered around their radios for family entertainment. Then the visually-stimulating television era came along, relegating once-popular radio dramas to the closets and hard drives of specialty collectors—with one exception: our nationwide community of people with visual impairments.

On January 7, Sun Sounds of Arizona, a radio service for the visually impaired, will present its newest Radio Theater selection, Shakespeare’s "Measure for Measure,"produced entirely by a volunteer cast and crew and directed by Valley theater critic M.V. Moorhead.

Director M.V. Moorhead
leads cast of "Measure for Measure."
"I’ve loved this play for years," says Moorhead, who directed a full production of it at Southwest Shakespeare Company in 2000. Several cast members from that production have reprised their roles for this hour-long Sun Sounds Radio Theater version.
 Director Moorhead is no stranger to Sun Sounds Radio Theater, this being his sixth directorial production for the radio reading service. Except for the narration, this production was recorded in a three-hour session in late August at the Sun Sounds studios in Tempe. In many cases the actors were cold-reading—for instance, veteran actor Tom Blackwood learned that he would be playing the lead role of the Duke that afternoon. "Due to skill both of the cast and the deft and patient engineers, our "guerilla radio theatre" production managed to come together," says Moorhead. 

While classed as one of Shakespeare’s comedies, Measure for Measure concerns a high government official who attempts to extort sexual favors from a young woman, in return for which, he says, he will spare the woman’s brother from execution—certainly a dramatic and gripping premise, but hardly the sort of plot usually associated with comedy.

The cast and crew of Sun Sounds Radio Theater’s Measure for Measure includes Jenn Banda (Isabella), Ezra Bemis (Servant), Tom Blackwood (Duke Vincentio), Meriam Conyers (Sister Francesca), David Gofstein (Escalus/The Provost), Owen Kerr (Lucio/Friar Peter/Messenger), Douglas Loynd (Pompey/Claudio), Grace Moorhead (Julietta), M.V. Moorhead (Angelo/Narration), Julie Peterson (Mistress Overdone), Susan St. John (Mariana) and volunteer engineers Mike McFadden and Roy Weinberg.

"Measure for Measure" will broadcast at 8 p.m. For those who would like to tune in, visit www.sunsounds.org/listen for online access.

Sun Sounds of Arizona is a radio reading and information access service for people who cannot read print due to a disability. A public service of Rio Salado College, Sun Sounds and 500 volunteers across the state provide information access free of charge, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week using radio, cable TV systems, telephone and the internet. To apply for service, donate, or volunteer, see www.sunsounds.org.


Monday, June 13, 2011

For One Outstanding Volunteer, Reading is an Act of Love


Frank Williams’ love of reading was cemented at a young age. Late in the evenings, after he’d gone to bed, he would listen through the walls of his boyhood home as his father read aloud to Frank’s mother.

“I’ve come to see that as a tremendous act of love - to read aloud to someone,” Williams said.

Today Williams, a Tempe resident, shares that act of love with thousands of Arizonans who hear him read aloud each week at Sun Sounds of Arizona, a state-wide reading service for people with disabilities who cannot use print.

In May Williams received the Gold Mic Award, given to the Sun Sounds Volunteer of the Year for outstanding service. He accepted the award in his typical passionate yet humble style.

“I’m embarrassed to receive praise for doing what I feel is reward enough in itself,” Williams said.

Williams began his volunteer work at Sun Sounds in 2008, reading The Arizona Republic live each week, and pre-recording other magazine programs. In three years he has recorded more than 10 novels for the nightly book programs, “A Good Book” and “Bookworld.” He also serves as an Ambassador at monthly speaking engagements, educating the public and potential listeners about the service.

Williams cites an incident of temporary blindness as a young adult which solidified for him the importance of reading. As a Green Beret stationed in Okinawa, he suffered a cerebral hemorrhage which resulted in spending a week in a darkened room, unable to see.

“I was most scared by the fact that I wouldn’t be able to read, something I’d cherished all my life,” he said.

Once his vision returned he promised that sharing the gift of reading would be part of his life’s work.

“Reading to those who cannot is an act of love, mercy, and kindness – “holy work” that I am deeply honored to share with the volunteers of Sun Sounds,” Williams said.

Sun Sounds of Arizona salutes Williams and the 200 volunteers who give more than 22,000 hours annually to provide access to information for print-disabled people.

A service of Rio Salado College, Sun Sounds of Arizona broadcasts from the Tempe campus, as well as from affiliates in Flagstaff, Tucson and Yuma. 49,000 people in Arizona hear six daily local and national newspapers, nearly 200 magazines, books, circulars and newsletters read aloud over radio, cable systems, telephone and the internet.

For more information visit http://www.sunsounds.org/.

Article contributed by Heidi Capriotti, Sun Sounds of Arizona marketing coordinator.

Wednesday, January 19, 2011

New Frontiers to Support Sun Sounds of Arizona


New Frontiers to support Sun Sounds On Wednesday, Jan. 19, 5 percent of proceeds from sales at the New Frontiers Marketplace will be donated to Sun Sounds of Arizona in Flagstaff. Sun Sounds, a part of the Division of Public Service for Rio Salado College, is an information access service primarily designed for and directed to an audience who are visually-impaired. In Flagstaff, more than 50 volunteers read the daily Arizona Daily Sun, magazines and books aloud and reach more than 49,000 members via individual receivers, online streaming and podcasting at sunsounds.org, and a telephone access system called Sun Dial II.

Sun Sounds of Arizona's broadcast, along with those of several other U.S. and Canadian radio reading services, is now available on Apple mobile devices using the iBlink Radio application. iBlink Radio, touted as the first app for visually impaired people, makes it easy to find current streaming and archived print information read aloud.

To download the free iBlink Radio app, go to iTlines or click the App Store on an Apple mobile device and search for iBlink Radio. For more information about applying for service or volunteering at Sun Sounds of Arizona, contact Eleanor Mooney, manager, Sun Sounds of Arizona in Flagstaff at 623-779-1775 or Eleanor.mooney@riomail.maricopa.edu.

Source: Arizona Daily Sun Newspaper (Jan. 2011)

Thursday, January 6, 2011

Sun Sounds Broadcasts Available on iPad, iPod and iPhone

Sun Sounds of Arizona's broadcast, along with those of several other US and Canadian radio reading services, is now available on Apple mobile devices, thanks to the iBlink Radio application developed by Serotek Corporation. iBlink Radio, touted as the first app for visually impaired people, makes it easy to find current streaming and archived print information read aloud.

To download the free iBlink Radio app, go to iTunes http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/i-blink-radio/id332027117?mt=8, or click the App Store on an Apple mobile device and search for iBlink Radio. Once installed, the iBlink Radio app offers an alphabetical listing of reading services. Look for "Arizona, Tempe, Sun Sounds" or "Arizona, Tucson, Sun Sounds" and tap the name to listen to the stream.

"We are constantly exploring new ways to offer information access," said Bill Pasco, director of Sun Sounds of Arizona, "and certainly technology is opening doors at an amazing pace. We are excited to be able to reach a mobile, technology-savvy audience with apps like Serotek's iBlink Radio."

Sun Sounds of Arizona is an information access service primarily designed for and directed to an audience who cannot see, hold or understand print due to a disability. Throughout the United States, Sun Sounds reaches members via, FM radio, TV cable, online streaming and podcasting at sunsounds.org, as well as a telephone access system called Sun Dial II.

For more information about the iBlink Radio app or other ways to access information from Sun Sounds of Arizona, log on to sunsounds.org or call Sun Sounds at 480-774-8300.

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Sun Sounds of Arizona, established in 1979, is a radio reading and information access service for people who cannot read conventional print due to a disability. A community service of Rio Salado College, Sun Sounds, with the help of 500 volunteers across the state, provides information access free of charge, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week using radio, designated cable systems, telephone and the internet.
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