Showing posts with label tempe. Show all posts
Showing posts with label tempe. Show all posts

Friday, January 23, 2015

Saturday Services for You Jan. 24 & 31

Image of a Rio Salado employee at front reception desk.

Take advantage of Saturday services at Rio Salado Tempe headquarters, January 24 and 31, 10 a.m. – 2 p.m.   

Students Services Available:

We are providing these extra hours of service to help you meet the increased demands that normally occur at the start of a new year.

Wednesday, October 8, 2014

Veterans Healthcare, Benefits & Resources Clinic

Flier for event, which includes the same text that appears below this image.
 
U.S. Rep. Kyrsten Sinema, Tempe Mayor Mark Mitchell, Councilmembers Robin Arredondo-Savage, Corey Woods, Phoenix VA, MIHS, and the East Valley Veterans Education Center are honored to host the

Veterans Healthcare, Benefits & Resources Clinic
Friday, October 17, 2014
10:00 a.m.—8 p.m.
 
Rio Salado College Southern and EVVEC Complex
3320 S. Price Rd., Tempe, AZ 85282



DURING THIS EVENT, VETERANS WILL BE ABLE TO:
  • Sign up for medical care
  • Check the status of existing primary care and other appointment requests
  • Receive one-on-one advising from VA benefits eligibility advisers
  • Check eligibility and sign up for Medicaid
  • Receive a range of education and information regarding grief, military sexual trauma, and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder
  • Receive information on all VBA benefits to include:
  • Compensation, Pension, Vocational and Rehabilitation and Employment, Home Loans, and Education

This is event is free and open to all veterans and their family members.

Thursday, April 24, 2014

Rio Teacher Job Fair this Friday


Tomorrow is the big day!

Rio Salado College is hosting the 12th Annual Teacher Education Career Day—a free community job fair that connects public, charter and private schools with potential teacher candidates. The event takes place Friday, Apr. 25, 12-4 p.m. at the Conference Center at Rio, 2323 W. 14th St., Tempe, AZ 85281.

More than 60 Arizona schools and districts will be on hand to collect resumes, interview candidates and talk about open positions in 2014-2015.

"The Teacher Education Career Day is a great opportunity for schools and districts to connect with qualified candidates from Rio Salado College's Teacher Preparation Program,” said Paulina Ngo, Rio Field Experience Coordinator. It is also a great networking and learning opportunity for individuals who are thinking of entering the teaching profession"

Attendees will have a chance to learn about career opportunities as a Certified Teacher, Substitute Teacher, Teacher Intern Candidate and Paraprofessional/Teacher’s Aide.  

Isaac School District Assistant Superintendent of Human Resources Dr. Bob Fleischmann attended the event for the first time last year. He said the prospects are good for teachers right now. “We have numerous openings that we’d like to fill, especially in the areas of math and science. If you’re interested in teaching and you have a strong skill set and are highly qualified, you’re more than likely to be interviewed in the school district.”

When asked how attendees should prepare, Fleischmann said, “I think your first five minutes are essential in making a good impression. You need to bring your resume and several copies with a cover letter. You need to make sure your grammar and punctuation are right on and dress professionally.”

While the event is open to the public, Rio students who are teacher certified by 2015 and teachers in residence will have an exclusive opportunity to participate in pre-screening interviews during the event.

One of those students is Cari Martinez. “I hope to practice my interviewing skills, make connections with new districts, and ultimately find a teaching job.”

Martinez will complete her Early Childhood Education program in May. “My short term goals are to finish up my preschool internship, and gain as much knowledge over the next month. In the long term I would hope to have a teaching job within a great district, working with a great team and making a difference in our early learners."

Koren Bean will also attend. “I am hoping to find a job. If not, I hope to have the opportunity to interview and learn which schools are expecting to hire Special Education teachers for the next school year.” Bean completed her Rio Special Education Cross Categorical Elementary Education program on April 5 and she’s ready to go to work.

Bean said she chose a career in teaching “because I have seen what a huge difference a good teacher can make for a child. Likewise, I have seen how a bad teacher can change the course of a student forever as well. I want to make a positive difference and I think that being a teacher is an excellent way to do that.”

For the latest details, and to register for this event, visit riosalado.edu/studentevents or call 480-517-8140.

This story can also be found in the April 12 edition of the Tempe Republic.
By Annette Flores, manager of Rio Salado College media relations.

Thursday, May 31, 2012

Save a Life with CPR

Contributed by Angela Ambrosia, Ph.D.
Rio Salado College Faculty Chair of Allied Health

 

According to the American Heart Association, in 2011, more than 380,000 incidents of sudden cardiac arrest occurred outside of hospitals and emergency rooms. Less than eight percent of these victims survive.

Fortunately, the hope for survival increases with effective bystander Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and the use of an Automated External Defibrillator provided at the time of the attack. In addition, four out of five cardiac arrests occur in the home, meaning a friend or family member’s life can be saved.

There is a misconception that only medical professionals need to know CPR, but learning how to properly administer CPR is vital for everyone. Because of the lack of proper training and the tendency to forget skills learned, nearly 70 percent of Americans feel helpless when administering CPR.

Rio Salado College offers three online courses in CPR; HCC109 – Basic Life Support for Healthcare providers, HES 106 – Heartsaver CPR AED and HES154 – Heartsaver First Aid CPR AED. These courses require an in-person skills assessment and provide the participant with an American Heart Association card upon completion of the course. This ensures the student’s knowledge is thorough and long lasting.

The success of the courses is evident through the students’ use of CPR during numerous real-life emergencies. In one situation, a student at Rio, was on his way to take the skills test for a CPR course and encountered an automobile accident. The student said that because of his training from Rio he had the confidence to secure the scene, call 911 and provide basic first aid to five victims involved in the accident.


Sarah Johnson, a mother of two and graduate of Rio’s CPR course, found the course to be very helpful, accessible and convenient with her busy schedule.

“If you set quiet time aside, you will get the most out of the class,” Johnson said. “Just knowing that I have the knowledge of CPR means that I don’t have to wait for someone else to get there to help.”

CPR courses at Rio Salado are not only extremely useful but also convenient. The college has offered these courses online since 2010, allowing students to become well practiced in crucial life support practices. In addition, the in-person skills assessment can be scheduled at a convenient time for the student.


For those who may not have the time to take an online course, and want to be prepared, a hands-on instructional video is available from the AHA in support of National CPR and AED Awareness Week, June 1-7.

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Keep in mind that hands-only CPR, which consists of only chest compressions, has proven to be as effective as mouth-to-mouth CPR in treating adult cardiac arrest victims. Taking a few classes online or watching a video is an easy and small price to pay for the ability to save a life.


June 1-7 is National CPR & AED Awareness Week. Rio Salado will celebrate CPR awareness throughout the month and provide a Laderal™ Face Shield CPR Barrier Key Ring to students who complete their coursework. The shield prevents direct contact with the mouth, nose and face to protect the rescuer and victim.


Article published in the Tempe Republic May 30

Tuesday, May 29, 2012

Rio Graduate Overcomes Obstacles

Of the 627 students who received degrees at Rio Salado’s recent commencement ceremony, perhaps none define perseverance better than Gregory Kosko.

In January of 2009, Kosko lost his job due to corporate economic cutbacks. Later that year, he was diagnosed with Essential Tremors, which later escalated into Parkinson’s disease.

“At that point, I was unemployed, disabled and discouraged,” Kosko said. “While time was not a factor, finances and the ability to physically write and type were huge obstacles.”

Kosko knew he couldn’t let his situation stand in the way of going back to school for a degree to further his re-careering options.

“I enrolled in college just out of high school but circumstances prevented me from completing,” Kosko said. “As I rolled into a job and then a career, I was constantly reminded how much more I could achieve if I would just go back and complete my college education.”

Kosko began researching his educational options and settled on Rio Salado College.

“I chose Rio Salado for three main reasons,” Kosko said. “Online courses allowed me to keep transportation costs at a minimum. Flexible start dates offered a way to manage my daily schedule, and Rio’s transfer options allowed a seamless transfer to Northern Arizona University (NAU).”
In addition, Kosko also considered Rio Salado’s Disability Services department when choosing his college.

“Disability Services, and specifically manager Terry Ferra, helped me through to the completion of each and every course,” Kosko said. “Without this assistance I simply would not have been able to return to school.”

Kosko also credits technology in helping see his academic goals become reality. He used Dragon voice recognition software to assist with taking online classes.
“My advice to others is to focus on the doors that have opened, along with the opportunities they present, and not on the doors that have closed,” Kosko said. “The past is out of your control, the future has yet to be written.”

Now the holder of an Associate in Arts degree, Kosko can focus his attention on the future, which includes further education and helping others with disabilities.

“The Parkinson's diagnosis inspired me to work with those who have disabilities because I experienced it firsthand,” Kosko said. “Until it happens to you, is almost impossible to understand its overall effect on day-to-day living. If I'm able to help just one person get through this and get on with their life, it will be well worth it.”

Kosko plans to continue his education at NAU by earning a bachelor’s degree next year, and then to pursue a master’s degree in education.

“The completion of my college degree will surely open some new doors, but returning to work was not the sole purpose behind achieving my degree,” Kosko said. “It was simply a lifelong goal and the satisfaction it brings is immeasurable.”

Published in the Tempe Republic Saturday, May 19, 2012.

Saturday, May 26, 2012

2007 Rio Salado GED Student Finishes Bachelor's Degree at ASU

Jana Easley (left) with fellow ASU Graduate
 Erica Collins
Jana Easley walked across the stage at Arizona State University's graduation ceremony earlier this month and has been accepted to the college’s master's fast track program for social work. It is an accomplishment to be proud of regardless of the circumstances, but for a high school dropout who struggled with drug addiction and abusive relationships, it is an impossible dream finally coming true.

Having received her General Education Diploma in 2007 through the Adult Basic Education department at Tempe-based Rio Salado College, Easley credits her continued success to the encouragement she received from ABE instructors. She shares her story with the hope that others will be motivated to take the first step and enroll in GED classes.

"I started my journey at a domestic violence shelter," Easley said. "At age 35, after 8 years in an abusive relationship, I was able to leave with my daughter and my life."

"My addiction to meth left me homeless and living on the streets. I had already lost my son and eventually custody of my daughter was given to her father," Easley said.

Easley was accepted into rehab through New Arizona Family Inc. (NAFI) and completed the program in four months. During this time, she tried to register GED classes at an institution in central Phoenix, but seats were limited and she was not accepted.

After 10 months sober, Easley relapsed.
"I lost everything," Easley said. "My apartment, my job, my vehicle, and I lost my daughter again."

"After a two and a half year relapse and many near death experiences, I was able to get sober again by the grace of god," Easley said. "I went back into the rooms of Alcoholics Anonymous and Crystal Meth Anonymous, got a sponsor and started working the 12 steps."

"For the first year of sobriety I worked at Kashman's Catering in Scottsdale. They gave me my first raise ever and invited me to the company Christmas party," Easley said. "It was reassuring. I was building self-confidence and was ready to tackle the GED again."

"I had heard through the grapevine that if I put a certain amount of hours in on my GED from Rio Salado College, they would pay for my first three classes at any Maricopa County Community College," Easley said. "That's what I needed to hear. I was 'all in'."

At 40 years of age, Easley cut her hours to part time and returned to the classroom.

"I spent many hours with Suzy, my GED teacher and mentor," Easley said. "Suzy had so much patience and believed in me until I believed in myself.

After her third attempt at the GED test, Easley received a late-night phone call from her instructor.

"What a moment that was," Easley said." She was actually crying when she told me. I can still hear it: 'J you passed! You're going to graduate!' I tear-up a little when I think about it."

After graduation, Easley spoke with a mentor from Rio Salado who helped her register for classes at Paradise Valley Community College.

"Rio kept their word and paid for my first three classes. I was really impressed," Easley said. "I started in the summer of 2007, by fall I entered as a full-time student and graduated in May of 2010 with my Associate degree and an acceptance letter from ASU."

Easley followed the example set by Rio Salado alumni who occasionally stopped by her GED class.

"I intended to get my bachelor's right from the start because that's what was modeled by prior students at Rio," Easley said. "They would tell us to get our GED and keep going, so that's what I'm doing!"

Easley will start a fast track program in the summer of 2013 and should earn her master's in social work by 2014.

"I celebrated six years of sobriety on March 11," Easley said. "I'm currently interning for the National Council on Alcohol and Drug Dependence for women. I want to work with women suffering from substance abuse; either one-on-one or in a group setting."

Easley said she hopes her story will encourage others to go back to school and change their own lives.

"Thinking about it could last a lifetime," Easley said. "Just do it! If one can believe, one can achieve."

Article published in the Tempe Republic May 26.

Friday, May 25, 2012

Take Summer Classes at Rio

Summer is usually a time for college students to take a break from their busy course loads and find a job or return home for a few months before the next school year begins. But now with the vast array of summer classes available for students, many of which online, the summer is also a time when students can get ahead and one step closer to earning their degree.
There are an abundance of opportunities for students to earn college credit this summer by enrolling in any one of a number of Rio Salado College classes and programs. Rio Salado offers online and in-person classes in 80 different subject areas in two separate summer sessions. This opportunity isn’t just for Rio Salado College students either. Rio course credits are transferable to any of the three in-state universities and Rio also has partnerships with a number of universities across the nation. So whether students are interested in learning about a new subject or completing that final course requirement in order to graduate, Rio has courses in everything from accounting to Japanese.
Here is a listing of some summer course options:
·         Buried Cities and Lost Tribes (ASB222): 8 and 12 weeks classes available. Learn about discoveries by researchers of lost civilizations and how they made their discoveries.
·         Introduction to Screenwriting (CRW190): 14 week classes available. Students have the opportunity to learn how to put together a movie or play script.
·         First-Year Composition (Eng 101): 8 and 16 week classes available. Students have the opportunity to develop their writing skills to write papers on a college level.
·         College Mathematics (MAT 142): 8 and 14 week classes available. Students learn basic math skills such as probability, finance and geometry.
·         Internet Marketing for SmallBusiness (SBS 220): This unique class is a part of the Small Business Management program at Rio. It teaches future Entrepreneurs how to effectively use internet marketing.

Monday, January 2, 2012

Volunteer Thespians Perform Shakespeare's 'Measure for Measure' on Sun Sounds of Arizona

In the 1940’s Americans gathered around their radios for family entertainment. Then the visually-stimulating television era came along, relegating once-popular radio dramas to the closets and hard drives of specialty collectors—with one exception: our nationwide community of people with visual impairments.

On January 7, Sun Sounds of Arizona, a radio service for the visually impaired, will present its newest Radio Theater selection, Shakespeare’s "Measure for Measure,"produced entirely by a volunteer cast and crew and directed by Valley theater critic M.V. Moorhead.

Director M.V. Moorhead
leads cast of "Measure for Measure."
"I’ve loved this play for years," says Moorhead, who directed a full production of it at Southwest Shakespeare Company in 2000. Several cast members from that production have reprised their roles for this hour-long Sun Sounds Radio Theater version.
 Director Moorhead is no stranger to Sun Sounds Radio Theater, this being his sixth directorial production for the radio reading service. Except for the narration, this production was recorded in a three-hour session in late August at the Sun Sounds studios in Tempe. In many cases the actors were cold-reading—for instance, veteran actor Tom Blackwood learned that he would be playing the lead role of the Duke that afternoon. "Due to skill both of the cast and the deft and patient engineers, our "guerilla radio theatre" production managed to come together," says Moorhead. 

While classed as one of Shakespeare’s comedies, Measure for Measure concerns a high government official who attempts to extort sexual favors from a young woman, in return for which, he says, he will spare the woman’s brother from execution—certainly a dramatic and gripping premise, but hardly the sort of plot usually associated with comedy.

The cast and crew of Sun Sounds Radio Theater’s Measure for Measure includes Jenn Banda (Isabella), Ezra Bemis (Servant), Tom Blackwood (Duke Vincentio), Meriam Conyers (Sister Francesca), David Gofstein (Escalus/The Provost), Owen Kerr (Lucio/Friar Peter/Messenger), Douglas Loynd (Pompey/Claudio), Grace Moorhead (Julietta), M.V. Moorhead (Angelo/Narration), Julie Peterson (Mistress Overdone), Susan St. John (Mariana) and volunteer engineers Mike McFadden and Roy Weinberg.

"Measure for Measure" will broadcast at 8 p.m. For those who would like to tune in, visit www.sunsounds.org/listen for online access.

Sun Sounds of Arizona is a radio reading and information access service for people who cannot read print due to a disability. A public service of Rio Salado College, Sun Sounds and 500 volunteers across the state provide information access free of charge, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week using radio, cable TV systems, telephone and the internet. To apply for service, donate, or volunteer, see www.sunsounds.org.